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We are thrilled to share the outstanding success of the 12th edition of Amsterdam Art Week 2024. Recognised as one of the Best Art Biennials and Festivals of Summer 2024, it featured over 250 art events and exhibitions in 5 days, attracting more than 45,000 local and international visitors, reaching nearly 1.5 million people digitally & featured in over 100 international and national articles.

Save the date for Amsterdam Art Week 2025!
Amsterdam Art Week 2025 will take place from 21 – 25 May. Mark your calendars and immerse yourself in the unique atmosphere that Amsterdam Art Week brings to the city each year! Keep an eye on our socials for further announcements.

Programme

Exhibition — Work on paper

The rhythm of ecstasy: the sex drawings, 1931-1948 | Sergei Eisenstein

For the groundbreaking film director Sergei Eisenstein (Riga, 1898 – Moscow, 1948), drawing was fundamental to his cinematic and theoretical practice—if one could even distinguish between them. From a young age, drawing was a recurring activity for Eisenstein. As a curious child, he was fascinated by the graphic work of artists such as Honoré Daumier and Jacques Callot. As his teenage friends would recall, Eisenstein had a true passion for drawing and spent countless hours humorously exercising his imagination. Some of his drawings were published by newspapers in St. Petersburg, and he created caricatures, sketches, and set designs for theater productions. However, he drew most prolifically during his stay in Mexico (1931-1932) for a film project he ultimately had to abandon. The so-called ‘sex drawings’—coined by historian Joan Neuberger—that were long kept hidden, are abundant during this period as a result of an emancipation from censorship during an enormously inspiring moment in his career. We see a range of sexual interactions, fantasies, and obscenities in explicitly queer combinations. They testify to Eisenstein’s philosophical inquiries, queer sexual expression and repression, and a great sense of humor. Back in the Soviet Union in 1932, he would continue to draw until his death in 1948, but under very different circumstances.

12 Jul up to 3 Aug — Ellen de Bruijne Projects
Exhibition — Work on paper

The rhythm of ecstasy: the sex drawings, 1931-1948 | Sergei Eisenstein

For the groundbreaking film director Sergei Eisenstein (Riga, 1898 – Moscow, 1948), drawing was fundamental to his cinematic and theoretical practice—if one could even distinguish between them. From a young age, drawing was a recurring activity for Eisenstein. As a curious child, he was fascinated by the graphic work of artists such as Honoré Daumier and Jacques Callot. As his teenage friends would recall, Eisenstein had a true passion for drawing and spent countless hours humorously exercising his imagination. Some of his drawings were published by newspapers in St. Petersburg, and he created caricatures, sketches, and set designs for theater productions. However, he drew most prolifically during his stay in Mexico (1931-1932) for a film project he ultimately had to abandon. The so-called ‘sex drawings’—coined by historian Joan Neuberger—that were long kept hidden, are abundant during this period as a result of an emancipation from censorship during an enormously inspiring moment in his career. We see a range of sexual interactions, fantasies, and obscenities in explicitly queer combinations. They testify to Eisenstein’s philosophical inquiries, queer sexual expression and repression, and a great sense of humor. Back in the Soviet Union in 1932, he would continue to draw until his death in 1948, but under very different circumstances.

12 Jul up to 3 Aug — Ellen de Bruijne Projects
Exhibition — Work on paper

The rhythm of ecstasy: the sex drawings, 1931-1948 | Sergei Eisenstein

For the groundbreaking film director Sergei Eisenstein (Riga, 1898 – Moscow, 1948), drawing was fundamental to his cinematic and theoretical practice—if one could even distinguish between them. From a young age, drawing was a recurring activity for Eisenstein. As a curious child, he was fascinated by the graphic work of artists such as Honoré Daumier and Jacques Callot. As his teenage friends would recall, Eisenstein had a true passion for drawing and spent countless hours humorously exercising his imagination. Some of his drawings were published by newspapers in St. Petersburg, and he created caricatures, sketches, and set designs for theater productions. However, he drew most prolifically during his stay in Mexico (1931-1932) for a film project he ultimately had to abandon. The so-called ‘sex drawings’—coined by historian Joan Neuberger—that were long kept hidden, are abundant during this period as a result of an emancipation from censorship during an enormously inspiring moment in his career. We see a range of sexual interactions, fantasies, and obscenities in explicitly queer combinations. They testify to Eisenstein’s philosophical inquiries, queer sexual expression and repression, and a great sense of humor. Back in the Soviet Union in 1932, he would continue to draw until his death in 1948, but under very different circumstances.

12 Jul up to 3 Aug — Ellen de Bruijne Projects
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Locations

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